October 21st, 2016

Clare’s Law is helping tackle domestic abuse

Clare’s Law is helping tackle domestic abuse Clare’s Law is helping tackle domestic abuse
Updated: 10:24 am, Mar 11, 2016

MORE than 50 people have contacted Warwickshire Police in the past two years to see whether their partner has a history of domestic violence.

The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme – more commonly know as Clare’s Law – was launched in the county back in March 2014.

It is named after Clare Wood who was murdered by her ex-boyfriend in February 2009 and did not know about his history of violence against women.

The joint venture between Warwickshire Police and partners, working together as Warwickshire Against Domestic Abuse, gives people the ‘right to ask’ police whether a new or existing partner has a history of violence.

If records show a person may be at risk, the police can disclose the information – if it is legal and considered necessary.

The scheme also allows police to act first by disclosing information in order to protect a potential victim of domestic abuse should they deem it appropriate.

And recently released figures revealed 53 people – 48 woman and five men – have used their ‘right to ask’ in the two years since the initiative was launched with 47 disclosures being made.

But police are still keen for people who are concerned about their partner’s past to get in touch.

Det Supt Steve Eccleston said: “The scheme helps protect victims, families and friends from devastating consequences while also enabling people to take informed action about their relationships.

“If anyone does have concerns they could be in a relationship with someone who may be abusive or been abusive to other partners in the past, and wants to make a more informed decision, it is important to talk to someone.

“The scheme is an opportunity for you to take back control and make the right decision on whether you are at risk by staying in that relationship.”

Taranjit Chana, home group senior client service manager, added: “Clare’s Law has empowered people to protect themselves, or loved ones.

“Anyone making an inquiry clearly has some concerns about their relationship and even in situations where their partner has no history of domestic abuse, we’d still urge them to contact police and use their ‘right to ask.’

Warwickshire Against Domestic Abuse offers a support line for help, advice and safety planning on 0800 408 1552.

The confidential service is free from landlines and available Monday to Friday from 9am to 9pm and from 8am to 4pm on Saturday.

Anyone with concerns about domestic violence can call 101 or in an emergency, 999.