October 24th, 2016

Volunteer police officer to retire after 44 years’ service

Volunteer police officer to retire after 44 years’ service Volunteer police officer to retire after 44 years’ service
Updated: 3:09 pm, May 07, 2015

A VOLUNTEER police officer who was awarded an MBE for services to policing is to retire.

Special Chief Officer Glyn Gardner, 73, from Warwick, will step down on Saturday (January 31) after 44 years of voluntary service, during which he served under eight Chief Constables.

Glyn, who joined Warwick’s Special Constabulary in 1970, was appointed Special Deputy Chief Officer in 1990.

He represented the Special Constabulary at the official opening of Leamington’s Warwickshire Justice Centre in 2011, where he was introduced to Her Majesty the Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh.

The pinnacle of his career as a special came in 2012 when he was awarded an MBE.

Alongside his duties as a special, Glyn spent his working career as a resource controller in the utility industry until he retired in 2001.

He said: “I have thoroughly enjoyed my time with the Warwickshire Special Constabulary and would like to thank all members of the specials for their support, and the support given to Warwickshire Police over the years I have been Chief Officer. I am immensely proud of what we have achieved together.

“I hope people will continue to support policing in the future and come forward and volunteer to be special constables. It is the most rewarding thing I have ever done and I have met so many different people and learnt so many different skills I would never have had the opportunity to do had I not joined up all those years ago.”

Retiring alongside the Warwick bobby is Special Deputy Chief Officer John Mills, 66, from Rugby, who has completed 25 years of service. Between them they have dedicated almost 70 years voluntary service to policing the communities of Warwickshire.

Warwickshire Police and Crime Commissioner Ron Ball said: “Being a member of the Special Constabulary is probably the most extreme form of volunteering that I can think of, and the 70 years of service that Glyn and John have accrued constitutes a truly remarkable achievement.”

Warwickshire Chief Constable Andy Parker added: “I would like to thank both Glyn and John for their years of exemplary leadership and significant contributions to protecting people from harm in Warwickshire.

“I am humbled by their achievements as volunteers and am privileged to have worked alongside them both for many years.”

The Chief Constable for Warwickshire Police will be accountable for the Warwickshire Special Constabulary from February 1 until a new Chief Officer team is appointed.

Visit www.specialswanted.co.uk to find out how to become a Special Constable.