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23rd Jan, 2022

Eight Most Expensive Places to Live in the UK

Editorial Correspondent 10th Jan, 2022 Updated: 11th Jan, 2022

WHEREVER you live, the cost of living is an important factor to consider when making decisions. While one person might find certain prices absurdly expensive or totally affordable, others may see them as normal and reasonable. If you’re thinking about settling down in a new place, we’ve created a list of the top eight most expensive places to live in the UK and their costs.

Source: https://pixabay.com/illustrations/london-britain-union-jack-453099/

8 – Kingston Upon Thames

This area isn’t the cheapest on our list, but it still has many advantages such as its proximity to Central London (where rent can be incredibly high) and several parks; there are also good transport links available to get around easily. However, food, drink, housing, and entertainment costs here are higher than average (289% above national average). On the other hand, some lower prices can also be found, such as health and personal care and restaurants and hotels. However, if you want to move to Kingston Upon Thames, you just might need to win the JohnSlots jackpot to be able to afford housing around here.

7 – Kingston-Upon-Hull

The cost of living in Hull is considerably higher than the national average; rent costs are particularly high (at 46% above this average), but so are the prices of food, drink and entertainment (58% above average) which make up a large part of many people’s budgets. Transport costs here (41% below average) might help to offset some of these expenses. Like most major cities in the UK, Kingston upon Hull has its share of problems related to crime and safety. This comes down to several different factors such as low levels of household income, poor education and availability of employment opportunities.

6 – Edinburgh

The capital city is one of the most expensive to live in the UK in terms of food and drink costs (at 193% above average) which can be quite problematic for many people on a budget. However, housing and transport costs in Edinburgh are very affordable when compared with other places on this list; transportation here is 69% cheaper than the national average while house prices are 56% lower than

average. Even though Edinburgh has excellent universities and colleges where students can spend money easily, it also has higher crime rates with 20 crimes per 1000 population. It’s important to note that these statistics vary depending on area: like everywhere else in the UK, some areas are safer than others.

5 – Liverpool

When you look at the average costs of housing, transport and food in Liverpool, everything can seem very cheap. Unfortunately, though, this isn’t true. Once these basic bills have been taken care of, not much money is left for entertainment or other miscellaneous expenditures which might be necessary (like clothes). The main issue with living here is that it doesn’t offer residents many job opportunities; this means that they may face financial problems due to lack of employment opportunities and low wages.

4 – Wolverhampton

This city has the highest cost of rent in the country (at 148% above national average); groceries and restaurants/hotels are also rather expensive. However, transport costs here are lower than average and these savings can come in very useful at the end of the month. Wolverhampton is a post-industrial area with higher crime rates and fewer job opportunities which can bring financial problems to some people living there. Since it has a population of 249,470 people, its size allows for many different places to go out but it also means that there’s little sense of community – although this might be the case elsewhere as well depending on your personal situation.

3 – Dundee

Among all UK cities, this one has the highest number (91%) of local shops; this contributes both positively and negatively towards quality of life: while these stores offer convenience and choice, they also mean that prices are higher than in other places. Dundee is one of the cheapest cities to live in when it comes to transport costs (it’s 76% cheaper than average) but groceries and restaurants/hotels are considerably more expensive here, at 196% and 152% above the national average respectively. Crime rates are also quite high compared with most other areas on this list which can have a negative impact on residents’ quality of life depending on how safe they feel where they live.

2 – Cardiff

Similar to Edinburgh, Cardiff has very high prices for housing (at 97% above national average), food and drink, but transport costs are much lower here (88% below the UK average). This means that you might need less money to live here than in other major cities. Cardiff also has lower crime rates than most places on the list, so people living here may experience better quality of life.

1 – Belfast

Belfast is the capital of Northern Ireland, and its culture reflects this; it’s quite different from what you might be used to if you’ve just moved to the UK. English is rarely heard in public spaces and Irish influence is strong throughout many aspects of everyday life (from pub food to music). Sadly, this city has high prices for almost everything (housing, transport, food and drink) which often brings financial problems for its residents. However, the unemployment rate in Belfast is lower than average which means that some people still afford not only rent but a decent quality of life as well.

Final Thoughts

It is difficult to know which city or area will ultimately suit your needs best, but our list should help you decide. When looking for more affordable places to live in our wonderful country, you will most certainly want to avoid these eight locations listed today!

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